Office of Continuing Education

Contact Us | Member Log In

Scholars for Life!
Speaker Series  

& Virtual Movie Club!

Overview

CCSU faculty and guest speakers bring their passions and knowledge to our Scholars For Life! Speaker series!  We are offering our talks on campus again, and if you are not ready to visit us in person we are also streaming the talks!  We are offering a hot buffet lunch or dinner before the talk too.  It’s a great way to visit with old friends and make new friends.   Everyone is welcoming!  Just let us know if it’s your first time here and we’ll take care of you!

How it Works

For our virtual talks, we will be using Zoom. When you register you will receive information on how to access the talk.

For our in-person talks, you will receive information on the location of our talks.

Previous Talks

Our Scholars For Life! Speaker Series sessions are recorded. The talks will stay on our website for 30 days, and you can request a link during that time to watch a talk you may have missed.

Contact
Christa Sterling
csterling@ccsu.edu
860-832-2277

Upcoming Scholars For Life! Speaker Series

Television in the 1960s and American Society (Virtual Attendance Registration)

Mr. Stephen Armstrong, Adjunct Professor of History

01/26/2023
1:00 pm

Password:

Join Stephen Armstrong as he discusses - Television of the 1960s: During this presentation we will review changes that took place in television in the 1960s and how television reflected the social changes of the period. The 1960s was an exciting era in television: in this session will discuss news shows, soap operas, variety shows, comedies and television drama of the era. We will examine some shows that you remember, and some shows that you might not remember, from the decade. Steve Armstrong is the social studies consultant for the Connecticut Board of Education. Before taking this position, Steve was a social studies department supervisor in the West Hartford, CT public schools. Steve is an adjunct instructor in the history department at Central Connecticut State University. He is a past president of the National Council for the Social Studies, and is also past president of the Connecticut Council for the Social Studies, the Connecticut Committee for the Promotion of History, and the New England History Teachers Association. Steve lives in South Windsor, CT. Steve has given many workshops on the use of popular music in the social studies classroom, and has led numerous travel trips for teachers and students. He has presented workshops at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and at the Bethel Woods Museum for the Arts, which is located on the site of the original Woodstock Music Festival.

Learn more
Register Here

Television in the 1960s and American Society (In-person Attendance Registration)

Mr. Stephen Armstrong, Adjunct Professor of History

01/26/2023
12:00 pm

Password:

Join Stephen Armstrong as he discusses - Television of the 1960s: During this presentation we will review changes that took place in television in the 1960s and how television reflected the social changes of the period. The 1960s was an exciting era in television: in this session will discuss news shows, soap operas, variety shows, comedies and television drama of the era. We will examine some shows that you remember, and some shows that you might not remember, from the decade. Steve Armstrong is the social studies consultant for the Connecticut Board of Education. Before taking this position, Steve was a social studies department supervisor in the West Hartford, CT public schools. Steve is an adjunct instructor in the history department at Central Connecticut State University. He is a past president of the National Council for the Social Studies, and is also past president of the Connecticut Council for the Social Studies, the Connecticut Committee for the Promotion of History, and the New England History Teachers Association. Steve lives in South Windsor, CT. Steve has given many workshops on the use of popular music in the social studies classroom, and has led numerous travel trips for teachers and students. He has presented workshops at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and at the Bethel Woods Museum for the Arts, which is located on the site of the original Woodstock Music Festival.

Learn more
Register Here

Scholars for Life! Virtual Movie Club: American Films of the 1970s Movie #1: The Godfather (1972) and The Godfather II (1944)

Stephen Armstrong, Professor of History

02/07/2023
7:00 pm

Password:

The Scholars For Life! Virtual Movie Club is an online forum where we meet with Professor Stephen Armstrong to talk about a series of movies. This spring Professor Armstrong will be discussing American films of the 1970s. Professor Armstrong leads the conversation with movie clips, questions and general discussion about the movies. Watch the movie before you attend the talk. You should be able to find these movies on Amazon or any other place you order movies. Please register for each virtual talk so that we can send you any materials to review before the discussion. Each movie has a separate registration. Make some popcorn and join us for a discussion! You can participate or just listen, but either way it'll be a nice way to spend some winter evenings. The 1970s were a fascinating period in the development of American movies. Movies explored content that had not be touched before. Exciting new directors, including Martin Scorsese, Stephen Spielberg, Robert Altman, and Francis Ford Coppola left the old studio system behind and created movies using new and innovative approaches. This series will explore six (actually seven) of the major films of the decade. Session #1: The Godfather (1972) and The Godfather II (1944), directed by Francis Ford Coppola Many say that they are two of the greatest films ever made. This is once case where the sequel is a good as the original film. Session #2: The Last Picture Show (1971), directed by Peter Bogdanovich A coming-of-age story in a small town in south Texas. Session #3: Chinatown (1974), directed by Roman Polanski A movie about fighting for water rights and much, much more in southern California in the early twentieth century. Session #4: Taxi Driver (1976), directed by Martin Scorsese The story of an ex-Vietnam veteran who drives a cab through the decadence and decay of New York City in the 1970s. Session #5: Network (1976), directed by Sidney Lumet A film about what happens to a television network when it begins to lose ratings. Session #6: Apocalypse New (1979), directed by Francis Ford Coppola One of the greatest war movies every made; the film explores the impact of the Vietnam War on individuals that fought it.

Learn more
Register Here

Manipulate History: How Images are Used to Shape our Views of the Past and Present (In-person Attendance Registration)

Mr. Brian Flinn, Professor of Art

02/10/2023
12:00 pm

Password:

Images have a communicating power that often supersedes the written word and can resonate in the mind long afterward. Throughout history, people have used images to record as well as alter historical events. Whether it be in painting, monuments, photography or video, images presented to the public have often been manipulated to help shape opinions and perceptions according to the artist or patron of the work. Discerning the truth can be a difficult challenge for many viewers, and learning how to read images in context is critical to understanding the motivations behind these artistic creations. Today we are faced with imaging software, from Photoshop, AI and Deep Fakes that present even greater trials to our senses. Being aware of how images have been used in the past, as well as how they are employed today, can help us keep a more objective perspective on both historical and current events. Brian Flinn is an artist and arts educator whose studio work currently uses a variety of mixed and digital media. His current art is directed at recording and examining personal experience within a series of events happening simultaneously and over segments of time. His work has been exhibited nationally throughout the United States as well as in Germany and Romania. Trained as an illustrator, his artwork often employs multiple narratives and symbolism culled from art history and contemporary culture. He received his BFA in Illustration (1990) and an MS in Art Education (1995) from the University of Bridgeport, and his MFA in Illustration from the School of Visual Arts (1993) in New York. He currently teaches painting, digital art and art education as an Associate Professor of Art at Central Connecticut State University. He is represented by Kehler Liddell Gallery in New Haven, CT and is a member of the Connecticut Academy of Fine Arts. www.brianflinn.com

Learn more
Register Here

Manipulated History: How Images are Used to Shape our Views of the Past and Present (Virtual Attendance Registration)

Mr. Brian Flinn, Professor of Art

02/10/2023
1:00 pm

Password:

Images have a communicating power that often supersedes the written word and can resonate in the mind long afterward. Throughout history, people have used images to record as well as alter historical events. Whether it be in painting, monuments, photography or video, images presented to the public have often been manipulated to help shape opinions and perceptions according to the artist or patron of the work. Discerning the truth can be a difficult challenge for many viewers, and learning how to read images in context is critical to understanding the motivations behind these artistic creations. Today we are faced with imaging software, from Photoshop, AI and Deep Fakes that present even greater trials to our senses. Being aware of how images have been used in the past, as well as how they are employed today, can help us keep a more objective perspective on both historical and current events. Brian Flinn is an artist and arts educator whose studio work currently uses a variety of mixed and digital media. His current art is directed at recording and examining personal experience within a series of events happening simultaneously and over segments of time. His work has been exhibited nationally throughout the United States as well as in Germany and Romania. Trained as an illustrator, his artwork often employs multiple narratives and symbolism culled from art history and contemporary culture. He received his BFA in Illustration (1990) and an MS in Art Education (1995) from the University of Bridgeport, and his MFA in Illustration from the School of Visual Arts (1993) in New York. He currently teaches painting, digital art and art education as an Associate Professor of Art at Central Connecticut State University. He is represented by Kehler Liddell Gallery in New Haven, CT and is a member of the Connecticut Academy of Fine Arts. www.brianflinn.com

Learn more
Register Here

Scholars for Life! Virtual Movie Club: American Films of the 1970s Movie #2: The Last Picture Show (1971)

Stephen Armstrong, Professor of History

02/21/2023
7:00 pm

Password:

The Scholars For Life! Virtual Movie Club is an online forum where we meet with Professor Stephen Armstrong to talk about a series of movies. This spring Professor Armstrong will be discussing American films of the 1970s. Professor Armstrong leads the conversation with movie clips, questions and general discussion about the movies. Watch the movie before you attend the talk. You should be able to find these movies on Amazon or any other place you order movies. Please register for each virtual talk so that we can send you any materials to review before the discussion. Each movie has a separate registration. Make some popcorn and join us for a discussion! You can participate or just listen, but either way it'll be a nice way to spend some winter evenings. The 1970s were a fascinating period in the development of American movies. Movies explored content that had not be touched before. Exciting new directors, including Martin Scorsese, Stephen Spielberg, Robert Altman, and Francis Ford Coppola left the old studio system behind and created movies using new and innovative approaches. This series will explore six (actually seven) of the major films of the decade. Session #1: The Godfather (1972) and The Godfather II (1944), directed by Francis Ford Coppola Many say that they are two of the greatest films ever made. This is once case where the sequel is a good as the original film. Session #2: The Last Picture Show (1971), directed by Peter Bogdanovich A coming-of-age story in a small town in south Texas. Session #3: Chinatown (1974), directed by Roman Polanski A movie about fighting for water rights and much, much more in southern California in the early twentieth century. Session #4: Taxi Driver (1976), directed by Martin Scorsese The story of an ex-Vietnam veteran who drives a cab through the decadence and decay of New York City in the 1970s. Session #5: Network (1976), directed by Sidney Lumet A film about what happens to a television network when it begins to lose ratings. Session #6: Apocalypse New (1979), directed by Francis Ford Coppola One of the greatest war movies every made; the film explores the impact of the Vietnam War on individuals that fought it.

Learn more
Register Here

Planets and Phantom Galaxies and Pillars of Creation, Oh My! The Triumph of the James Webb Space Telescope (In-person Attendance Registration)

Dr. Kristine Larsen, Professor of Geological Sciences

02/28/2023
12:00 pm

Password:

The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) was launched on Christmas 2021, several years late but to much fanfare. Over a year later, we are right to ask whether the mission has lived up to the hype. The answer is a resounding YES! Join us on a journey of discovery through space and time as we celebrate how JWST has changed our view of the universe in such a short period of time. Dr. Larsen is a proud graduate of CCSU, having been a member of the first class of students in the university Honors Program. She currently serves as Director of the Honors Program. Education BA - Physics, CCSU, 1985 MS - Physics, UCONN, 1987 PhD - Physics, UCONN, 1990 Dr. Larsen specializes in issues related to science and society, including the history of women in science, misconceptions and pseudoscience, and the uses and misuses of science in pop culture. She is heavily involved in science outreach and serves on the Board of Advisors of the Springfield (Vermont) Telescope Makers and the American Association of Variable Star Observers. She is also the editor of the Astronomical League's Reflector magazine. For her full bio, visit here: https://directory.ccsu.edu/person/kristine-larsen

Learn more
Register Here

Planets and Phantom Galaxies and Pillars of Creation, Oh My! The Triumph of the James Webb Space Telescope (Virtual Attendance Registration)

Dr. Kristine Larsen, Professor of Geological Sciences

02/28/2023
1:00 pm

Password:

The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) was launched on Christmas 2021, several years late but to much fanfare. Over a year later, we are right to ask whether the mission has lived up to the hype. The answer is a resounding YES! Join us on a journey of discovery through space and time as we celebrate how JWST has changed our view of the universe in such a short period of time. Dr. Larsen is a proud graduate of CCSU, having been a member of the first class of students in the university Honors Program. She currently serves as Director of the Honors Program. Education BA - Physics, CCSU, 1985 MS - Physics, UCONN, 1987 PhD - Physics, UCONN, 1990 Dr. Larsen specializes in issues related to science and society, including the history of women in science, misconceptions and pseudoscience, and the uses and misuses of science in pop culture. She is heavily involved in science outreach and serves on the Board of Advisors of the Springfield (Vermont) Telescope Makers and the American Association of Variable Star Observers. She is also the editor of the Astronomical League's Reflector magazine. For her full bio, visit here: https://directory.ccsu.edu/person/kristine-larsen

Learn more
Register Here

Scholars for Life! Virtual Movie Club: American Films of the 1970s Movie #3: Chinatown (1974)

Stephen Armstrong, Professor of History

03/07/2023
7:00 pm

Password:

The Scholars For Life! Virtual Movie Club is an online forum where we meet with Professor Stephen Armstrong to talk about a series of movies. This spring Professor Armstrong will be discussing American films of the 1970s. Professor Armstrong leads the conversation with movie clips, questions and general discussion about the movies. Watch the movie before you attend the talk. You should be able to find these movies on Amazon or any other place you order movies. Please register for each virtual talk so that we can send you any materials to review before the discussion. Each movie has a separate registration. Make some popcorn and join us for a discussion! You can participate or just listen, but either way it'll be a nice way to spend some winter evenings. The 1970s were a fascinating period in the development of American movies. Movies explored content that had not be touched before. Exciting new directors, including Martin Scorsese, Stephen Spielberg, Robert Altman, and Francis Ford Coppola left the old studio system behind and created movies using new and innovative approaches. This series will explore six (actually seven) of the major films of the decade. Session #1: The Godfather (1972) and The Godfather II (1944), directed by Francis Ford Coppola Many say that they are two of the greatest films ever made. This is once case where the sequel is a good as the original film. Session #2: The Last Picture Show (1971), directed by Peter Bogdanovich A coming-of-age story in a small town in south Texas. Session #3: Chinatown (1974), directed by Roman Polanski A movie about fighting for water rights and much, much more in southern California in the early twentieth century. Session #4: Taxi Driver (1976), directed by Martin Scorsese The story of an ex-Vietnam veteran who drives a cab through the decadence and decay of New York City in the 1970s. Session #5: Network (1976), directed by Sidney Lumet A film about what happens to a television network when it begins to lose ratings. Session #6: Apocalypse New (1979), directed by Francis Ford Coppola One of the greatest war movies every made; the film explores the impact of the Vietnam War on individuals that fought it.

Learn more
Register Here

Scholars for Life! Virtual Movie Club: American Films of the 1970s Movie #4: Taxi Driver (1976)

Stephen Armstrong, Professor of History

03/21/2023
7:00 pm

Password:

The Scholars For Life! Virtual Movie Club is an online forum where we meet with Professor Stephen Armstrong to talk about a series of movies. This spring Professor Armstrong will be discussing American films of the 1970s. Professor Armstrong leads the conversation with movie clips, questions and general discussion about the movies. Watch the movie before you attend the talk. You should be able to find these movies on Amazon or any other place you order movies. Please register for each virtual talk so that we can send you any materials to review before the discussion. Each movie has a separate registration. Make some popcorn and join us for a discussion! You can participate or just listen, but either way it'll be a nice way to spend some winter evenings. The 1970s were a fascinating period in the development of American movies. Movies explored content that had not be touched before. Exciting new directors, including Martin Scorsese, Stephen Spielberg, Robert Altman, and Francis Ford Coppola left the old studio system behind and created movies using new and innovative approaches. This series will explore six (actually seven) of the major films of the decade. Session #1: The Godfather (1972) and The Godfather II (1944), directed by Francis Ford Coppola Many say that they are two of the greatest films ever made. This is once case where the sequel is a good as the original film. Session #2: The Last Picture Show (1971), directed by Peter Bogdanovich A coming-of-age story in a small town in south Texas. Session #3: Chinatown (1974), directed by Roman Polanski A movie about fighting for water rights and much, much more in southern California in the early twentieth century. Session #4: Taxi Driver (1976), directed by Martin Scorsese The story of an ex-Vietnam veteran who drives a cab through the decadence and decay of New York City in the 1970s. Session #5: Network (1976), directed by Sidney Lumet A film about what happens to a television network when it begins to lose ratings. Session #6: Apocalypse New (1979), directed by Francis Ford Coppola One of the greatest war movies every made; the film explores the impact of the Vietnam War on individuals that fought it.

Learn more
Register Here

Thanks to our Sponsors

Hartford Health Care Sponsor
CCSU Sponsor

More Life, Leisure & Community Courses

Mini 'MESTERS

EVENTS